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  • BWRC & LEADERS Seminar Series – Bing Chen
    14:30 -15:30
    2021.04.14

    Register in advance for this meeting:
    https://queensu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYvd-6tqT8qG9DSvPPtH6SK1iEfJS2zheAm

    After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

     

    Abstract

    An oil spill is a release of liquid petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment due to human activities, and is a challenging pollution problem. The term often refers to marine oil spills, including releases of crude oil from tankers, offshore platforms, drilling rigs and wells, spills of petroleum products and by-products, and spill of any oily substance refuse or waste oil. From the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989, BP Deepwater Horizon (Macondo) oil in 2010, to the Northeast Brazil oil spill in 2019, marine oil spills have been reported worldwide and have caused tremendous concern because of their significant negative and long-term impacts on ecological and socio-economic systems. The risk of marine oil spills has been increasing considering the growth of global shipping, deep-sea oil & gas operation, and diverse near/offshore activities. Response to a spill incident can be challenged by not only operational and technical limitations but also unfriendly environmental factors. The harsh marine environment (such as strong wind and wave, cold air and water, sea ice, and low visibility prevailing in the Arctic and Northern Atlantic Oceans) make response operations much more difficult and significantly reduce the window of response opportunity. There are wide recognitions of pressing needs in innovative research to improve response efficiency and capabilities. This talk will provide an overview of the current response practice, challenges and opportunities, and then introduce research progress in marine oil spill response decision making and cleanup technologies in the Northern Region Persistent Organic Pollution Control (NRPOP) Laboratory at the Memorial University in Canada. The key research topics mainly cover the simulation and AI aided response decision making, AOP based integrated on-site decanting technologies, and biosurfactant-based green treating agents as well as their lab testing and applications.

    Bio

    Dr. Bing Chen is Professor and Head of Department of Civil Engineering and Director of Northern Region Persistent Organic Pollution Control (NRPOP) Laboratory at the Memorial University of Newfoundland. He is also the founding Director of the global Network on Persistent, Emerging and Organic PoLlution in the Environment (PEOPLE Network). He is an elected Fellow of Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE), Fellow of Fellow of Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC), and Member of Royal Society of Canada (RSC) College.

    Dr. Chen is an internationally respected leader in environmental engineering research with exemplary achievements in environmental emergency (e.g., on/off shore oil spills) responses, water/wastewater treatment, AI-aided decision making, and environmental sustainability. He has produced over 400 technical publications and 7 patents/disclosures, gave over and trained over 70 thesis-based graduate students and PDFs. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and has served as Senior Advisor of the United Nations Development Programme, Vice-President of the Canadian Association on Water Quality, Vice-President of Sigma Xi Avalon Chapter, Member of the Royal Society of Canada’s Expert Panel, Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Systems Research (Springer), Associate Editor of 2 journals, Editorial Board Member of 6 other journals, and adjunct/visiting professor of 6 institutions worldwide. He has given over 70 invited keynotes and guest lectures worldwide. He has received many awards such as Water Environment Federation A.S. Bedell Award and Terra Nova Young Innovator Award and diverse conference/paper awards. As a registered Professional Engineer, Dr. Chen has provided consulting service to governments and industry from environmental/water, oil and gas, petrochemical, shipping, fishing, mining, and agriculture sectors as well as NGOs and communities in Canada and worldwide.

15
  • Award/Grant – The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize is given annually in recognition of outstanding, transdisciplinary research accomplishment in ocean drilling to an honoree within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D.

    The Taira Prize is generously funded through the International Ocean DISCOVERY Program and is given in partnership between AGU and the Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU). It is presented at the AGU Fall Meeting.

    The prize was named after Dr. Asahiko Taira of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. Dr. Taira has more than 40 years of experience in geological research and previously served as an associate professor at Kochi University, as well as a professor at the University of Tokyo. His work has been published in more than 200 American and Japanese publications.

  • Award/Grant – Climate Communications Prize
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Climate Communication Prize is given annually to a scientist in recognition for the communication of climate science to promote scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values, particularly around climate change. Successful candidates work in a climate science field and have had significant impact communicating about climate science with the general public and other non-scientists.

    Previously funded through the generosity of Nature’s Own of Boulder, Colorado, this prize was established in 2011 to highlight the importance of increasing awareness and understanding of climate science. The Climate Communication Prize honors an established career track record of climate communication, or a more specific communication campaign around climate science.

  • Award/Grant – Waldo E. Smith Award
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Waldo E. Smith Award is an award given biennially in even numbered years to a senior scientist in recognition of extraordinary service to Earth and space science. Successful candidates have strengthened and helped advance our scientific disciplines, as well as played unique leadership roles in scientific associations, education, legislation, research, management, philanthropy, or the public understanding of science.

    Originally established in 1982 as the Waldo E. Smith Medal, it was reclassified as the Waldo E. Smith Award in 2012. Waldo E. Smith, a specialist in hydrology and civil engineering, became the first AGU Executive Secretary (and later, Executive Director) in 1944 and served in that capacity for 26 years. Under his leadership, AGU launched new scientific journals and Smith helped guide the careers of many young geophysicists. As Executive Director Emeritus, Smith became the first recipient of his namesake medal.

  • Award/Grant – Edward A. Flinn Award
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Charles S. Falkenberg Award is an annual award sponsored by AGU and the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) to recognize an early to mid-career scientist who has contributed to the quality of life, economic opportunities and stewardship of the planet through the use of Earth science information and to the public awareness of the importance of understanding our planet.

    Charles S. Falkenberg was a computer scientist whose research focused on enabling practical applications of Earth science through data visualization and information technology. Falkenberg was also committed to increasing public awareness of both the research methods and findings regarding the Earth’s environment. After he and his family died in the tragic events of 11 September 2001, Falkenberg was posthumously recognized as the first recipient of this award in 2002.

  • Award/Grant – Charles S. Falkenberg
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Charles S. Falkenberg Award is an annual award sponsored by AGU and the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) to recognize an early to mid-career scientist who has contributed to the quality of life, economic opportunities and stewardship of the planet through the use of Earth science information and to the public awareness of the importance of understanding our planet.

    Charles S. Falkenberg was a computer scientist whose research focused on enabling practical applications of Earth science through data visualization and information technology. Falkenberg was also committed to increasing public awareness of both the research methods and findings regarding the Earth’s environment. After he and his family died in the tragic events of 11 September 2001, Falkenberg was posthumously recognized as the first recipient of this award in 2002.

  • Award/Grant – Ahtelstan Spilhaus Award
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Athelstan Spilhaus Award is given annually to an honoree in recognition of their enhancement of the public engagement with Earth and space sciences through devoting portions of their career conveying to the general public the excitement, significance, and beauty of Earth and space science.

    Athelstan F. Spilhaus, Sr. was a geophysicist and meteorologist who made innovative contributions to science, education, and public service. As a scientist and cartoonist, Spilhaus enthusiastically communicated with non-scientists through an informative science center at the 1961 World’s Fair in Seattle, as well as a long-running science cartoon featured in approximately 100 newspapers spanning the United States.

  • Award/Grant – William Bowie Medal
    All day
    2021.04.15

    AGU’s highest honor, the William Bowie Medal, is given annually to one honoree in recognition of outstanding contributions to fundamental Earth and space science and for unselfish cooperation in research. Unselfish cooperation is considered volunteer activity above and beyond any job requirements.

    The medal was established in 1939 in honor of William Bowie for his spirit of helpfulness and friendliness in unselfish cooperative research. In addition to serving as the first president of AGU (1920–1922), Bowie was also the first recipient of this medal.

  • Award/Grant – Roger Revelle Medal
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Roger Revelle Medal is given annually to one honoree in recognition of outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate or related aspects of the Earth system.

    The Revelle Medal is named in honor of Roger Revelle, an oceanographer who made substantial contributions to the awareness of global climate change. Revelle served as an AGU section president for the Ocean Sciences section (1956–1959). He was renowned for his significant contributions to the study of oceanography, including: pioneering work on carbon dioxide balance in the oceans and its effect on climate modification, fostering oceanographic exploration presaging plate tectonics, observations on the biological effects of radiation in the marine environment, and his studies of human population growth and global food supplies

  • Award/Grant – Maurice Ewing Medal
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Maurice Ewing Medal is given annually to one honoree in recognition of significant original contributions to the ocean sciences which includes for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation and/or outstanding service to the marine sciences.

    The Ewing Medal is jointly sponsored with the United States Navy and is named in honor of Maurice Ewing, who made significant contributions to deep-sea exploration.

  • Award/Grant – Joane Simpson Medal for Mid-Career Scientists
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The Joanne Simpson Medal is given annually to two to three mid-career honorees in recognition of their significant contributions to Earth and space science. Recipients of this award may work across any Earth and space science discipline.

    This medal is named in honor of Joanne Simpson, who was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in meteorology and during her career made fundamental contributions to modern research on tropical clouds and hurricanes. The medal recognizes exceptional mid-career scientists who have made transformative scientific advances or breakthrough in the Earth and space sciences, have demonstrated strong leadership, and provided outstanding service to science and society. Medalists are selected by the Joanne Simpson Medal Committee.

  • Award/Grant – James B. Macelwane Medal
    All day
    2021.04.15

    The James B. Macelwane Medal is given annually to three to five early career scientists in recognition of their significant contributions to Earth and space science. Nominees are selected for the medal based on their depth and breadth of research, impact, creativity as well as service, outreach, and diversity.

    The Macelwane Medal was named in honor of former AGU president James B. Macelwane (1953-1956) who was renowned for his contributions to geophysics. Macelwane was also deeply interested in teaching and encouraging scientists, founding the Department of Geophysics at St. Louis University and serving as Dean of the Graduate School, along with various other roles, all while always committing to teach at least one course.

  • More events
    • Award/Grant - The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Asahiko Taira International Scientific Ocean Drilling Research Prize is given annually in recognition of outstanding, transdisciplinary research accomplishment in ocean drilling to an honoree within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D.

      The Taira Prize is generously funded through the International Ocean DISCOVERY Program and is given in partnership between AGU and the Japan Geoscience Union (JpGU). It is presented at the AGU Fall Meeting.

      The prize was named after Dr. Asahiko Taira of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. Dr. Taira has more than 40 years of experience in geological research and previously served as an associate professor at Kochi University, as well as a professor at the University of Tokyo. His work has been published in more than 200 American and Japanese publications.

    • Award/Grant - Climate Communications Prize
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Climate Communication Prize is given annually to a scientist in recognition for the communication of climate science to promote scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values, particularly around climate change. Successful candidates work in a climate science field and have had significant impact communicating about climate science with the general public and other non-scientists.

      Previously funded through the generosity of Nature’s Own of Boulder, Colorado, this prize was established in 2011 to highlight the importance of increasing awareness and understanding of climate science. The Climate Communication Prize honors an established career track record of climate communication, or a more specific communication campaign around climate science.

    • Award/Grant - Waldo E. Smith Award
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Waldo E. Smith Award is an award given biennially in even numbered years to a senior scientist in recognition of extraordinary service to Earth and space science. Successful candidates have strengthened and helped advance our scientific disciplines, as well as played unique leadership roles in scientific associations, education, legislation, research, management, philanthropy, or the public understanding of science.

      Originally established in 1982 as the Waldo E. Smith Medal, it was reclassified as the Waldo E. Smith Award in 2012. Waldo E. Smith, a specialist in hydrology and civil engineering, became the first AGU Executive Secretary (and later, Executive Director) in 1944 and served in that capacity for 26 years. Under his leadership, AGU launched new scientific journals and Smith helped guide the careers of many young geophysicists. As Executive Director Emeritus, Smith became the first recipient of his namesake medal.

    • Award/Grant - Edward A. Flinn Award
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Charles S. Falkenberg Award is an annual award sponsored by AGU and the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) to recognize an early to mid-career scientist who has contributed to the quality of life, economic opportunities and stewardship of the planet through the use of Earth science information and to the public awareness of the importance of understanding our planet.

      Charles S. Falkenberg was a computer scientist whose research focused on enabling practical applications of Earth science through data visualization and information technology. Falkenberg was also committed to increasing public awareness of both the research methods and findings regarding the Earth’s environment. After he and his family died in the tragic events of 11 September 2001, Falkenberg was posthumously recognized as the first recipient of this award in 2002.

    • Award/Grant - Charles S. Falkenberg
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Charles S. Falkenberg Award is an annual award sponsored by AGU and the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) to recognize an early to mid-career scientist who has contributed to the quality of life, economic opportunities and stewardship of the planet through the use of Earth science information and to the public awareness of the importance of understanding our planet.

      Charles S. Falkenberg was a computer scientist whose research focused on enabling practical applications of Earth science through data visualization and information technology. Falkenberg was also committed to increasing public awareness of both the research methods and findings regarding the Earth’s environment. After he and his family died in the tragic events of 11 September 2001, Falkenberg was posthumously recognized as the first recipient of this award in 2002.

    • Award/Grant - Ahtelstan Spilhaus Award
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Athelstan Spilhaus Award is given annually to an honoree in recognition of their enhancement of the public engagement with Earth and space sciences through devoting portions of their career conveying to the general public the excitement, significance, and beauty of Earth and space science.

      Athelstan F. Spilhaus, Sr. was a geophysicist and meteorologist who made innovative contributions to science, education, and public service. As a scientist and cartoonist, Spilhaus enthusiastically communicated with non-scientists through an informative science center at the 1961 World’s Fair in Seattle, as well as a long-running science cartoon featured in approximately 100 newspapers spanning the United States.

    • Award/Grant - William Bowie Medal
      All day
      2021.04.15

      AGU’s highest honor, the William Bowie Medal, is given annually to one honoree in recognition of outstanding contributions to fundamental Earth and space science and for unselfish cooperation in research. Unselfish cooperation is considered volunteer activity above and beyond any job requirements.

      The medal was established in 1939 in honor of William Bowie for his spirit of helpfulness and friendliness in unselfish cooperative research. In addition to serving as the first president of AGU (1920–1922), Bowie was also the first recipient of this medal.

    • Award/Grant - Roger Revelle Medal
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Roger Revelle Medal is given annually to one honoree in recognition of outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate or related aspects of the Earth system.

      The Revelle Medal is named in honor of Roger Revelle, an oceanographer who made substantial contributions to the awareness of global climate change. Revelle served as an AGU section president for the Ocean Sciences section (1956–1959). He was renowned for his significant contributions to the study of oceanography, including: pioneering work on carbon dioxide balance in the oceans and its effect on climate modification, fostering oceanographic exploration presaging plate tectonics, observations on the biological effects of radiation in the marine environment, and his studies of human population growth and global food supplies

    • Award/Grant - Maurice Ewing Medal
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Maurice Ewing Medal is given annually to one honoree in recognition of significant original contributions to the ocean sciences which includes for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation and/or outstanding service to the marine sciences.

      The Ewing Medal is jointly sponsored with the United States Navy and is named in honor of Maurice Ewing, who made significant contributions to deep-sea exploration.

    • Award/Grant - Joane Simpson Medal for Mid-Career Scientists
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The Joanne Simpson Medal is given annually to two to three mid-career honorees in recognition of their significant contributions to Earth and space science. Recipients of this award may work across any Earth and space science discipline.

      This medal is named in honor of Joanne Simpson, who was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in meteorology and during her career made fundamental contributions to modern research on tropical clouds and hurricanes. The medal recognizes exceptional mid-career scientists who have made transformative scientific advances or breakthrough in the Earth and space sciences, have demonstrated strong leadership, and provided outstanding service to science and society. Medalists are selected by the Joanne Simpson Medal Committee.

    • Award/Grant - James B. Macelwane Medal
      All day
      2021.04.15

      The James B. Macelwane Medal is given annually to three to five early career scientists in recognition of their significant contributions to Earth and space science. Nominees are selected for the medal based on their depth and breadth of research, impact, creativity as well as service, outreach, and diversity.

      The Macelwane Medal was named in honor of former AGU president James B. Macelwane (1953-1956) who was renowned for his contributions to geophysics. Macelwane was also deeply interested in teaching and encouraging scientists, founding the Department of Geophysics at St. Louis University and serving as Dean of the Graduate School, along with various other roles, all while always committing to teach at least one course.

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